Flashback to the 2013 Presidential Inauguration

IMG_5740 - CopyAfter nearly a year of polarizing politics, it is easy to forget that 2013 started fresh with the second inauguration of President Barack Obama, beginning another four-year term.

No matter the party, a Presidential Inauguration represents a rare convergence of people gathered to witness a moment in history suffused with tradition and symbolism, shared with the world via the media. I have always respected that process.

In January 2013 I headed to D.C. to quietly help with media credentials, especially during the first distribution days. Also took the opportunity to see friends at such events as the Green Inaugural Ball at the multi-media Newseum.

On January 21, with tens of thousands of others, I attended the public ceremony held on the steps of the U.S. Capitol. IMG_5618 - inauguration

Actually, the constitutional oath had already been administered on the required date (January 20) in private because that fell on a Sunday. Just as with President Eisenhower in 1957 and President Reagan in 1985, President Obama delayed taking the public oath until the next day.

But it rang true, as ever.

Once again, people gathered. The colors were raised. The band played. The media chronicled.

And the newly re-elected President spoke.

Obama 2013 Swearing InLooking back, that might seem now more like a quick pause during a constantly unfolding saga. Afterward, everyone in D.C. went back to their respective spots. I headed back to Chicago to teach my Mass Media and Politics course.

Yet I felt recharged once again witnessing that singular, reassuring ritual in the American political process. A reminder that what we do can and does make a difference.

Text and photographs © 2014 Walter J. Podrazik plus public image from whitehouse.gov

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Media, Review 2013. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s